How to empty the App Inventor “Backpack”

You know about the App Inventor Backpack?

You can drag blocks into the “Backpack” icon at upper right of the MIT App Inventor Blocks editor. Once in the backpack, you can later drag items out of the backpack  providing a nice way to move blocks around or between apps.

Until recently, the backpack was automatically emptied when you exited App Inventor. But … that has changed recently!

A couple of months ago the Backpack behavior was changed so Backpack content is  persistent. That means the backpack retains a copy of your blocks even when you exit App Inventor.

This makes it easier to move favorite code blocks between apps or apps you download from the MIT Gallery.

To empty the backpack, you need to right-click (Ctrl-click on a Mac) somewhere in the whitespace (background) and then select Empty the Backpack from the pop up menu.

Capture

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Demonstration app for using FirebaseDB in AppInventor

FirebaseDB provides for sharing between users all running the exact same app on their device. Read “What is FirebaseDB?” to learn more about FirebaseDB and what it does for your applications.

This is a quick and very short app that demonstrates the fundamental operation of FirebaseDB when used in MIT App Inventor. I hope to create a more interesting demo app a bit later.

Caution: FirebaseDB is an experimental component offered by MIT App Inventor. FirebaseDB remains under development and is subject to change; apps written today might not work in the future. Apps containing the FirebaseDB component will not work in the emulator – run on your phone or tablet instead. At this time, the cloud-based database is a shared database, shared among multiple users, and cannot – yet – be linked to your personal Google account.

FirebaseDB is Similar to TinyWebDB

The programming interface for FirebaseDB is nearly the same as that used for TinyWebDBTinyWebDB is a simple cloud-based database – to use, you need to set up the TinyWebDB on your own server or on Google’s servers. With your data stored in the “cloud”, your data may be shared among many apps. For the FirebaseDB demo, you do not need to set up your own server, nor do you need to use TinyWebDB:

For details on setting up and using TinyWebDB – including some tricks that enable sharing of TinyWebDB data between apps – please see my book,

  • App Inventor 2 Databases and Files (Volume 3 e-book)
    Step-by-step TinyDB, TinyWebDB, Fusion Tables and Files
    Buy from: Amazon, Google Books, Kobo Books

For more information, including a sample chapter, please see my App Inventor books page.

Sample App User Interface

Our simple demonstration app stores and retrieves a text value to and from the FirebaseDB. As with TinyDB or TinyWebDB, enter a “tag” value to use to look up the value. For example, a tag value could be a part number, and the value could be the text description of the part’s name. Or the tag could be a phone number and the value could be the name of the person who has that phone number.

Screenshot_20160815-152608

The program is operated by entering a tag and a value and then pressing the Store Value button. The value entered is written to the FirebaseDB database in the cloud.

After a value has been stored, you retrieve values by entering the original tag and pressing Retrieve Value. The data corresponding to the tag is retrieved from FirebaseDB and display in the Value field, on screen.

If the app is run simultaneously on other devices, any data updates made on the other devices result in all devices receiving a data changed notification. When the data in the FirebaseDB is changed, the new data is displayed on all devices.

Designer View

A combination of vertical and horizontal layouts is used to organize the positions of the controls (see the Components list, below, or download the sample code).

Store Value and Retrieve Value are buttons. Tag and Value are labels, followed by text boxes for data entry.  Data Changed Event and the status message are both labels.

Drag the FirebaseDB component from the Experimental section of the Designer controls palette. You will receive a warning that FirebaseDB is experimental.

FirebaseDesigner

FBDemo_Components

Blocks View

(Sorry for the image quality on these three blocks – the screen capture utility I used for these did not do a very good job)

The btnStoreValue event handler reads the enter tag and data value from the text boxes on screen, and then stores those to the FirebaseDB. Find the FirebaseDB StoreValue component by clicking on the FirebaseDB component in the Blocks list.

FirebaseBlocks1

Fetching a store value is simple – call FirebaseDB’s GetValue method and pass to it the tag. Unlike TinyDB (but similar to TinyWebDB), the value is not read instantaneously but instead, once the data is read and available, an event called GotValue occurs.  A GotValue event handler processed the incoming data; in our simple app, the data is stored back in to the Value text box, on screen.

FirebaseBlocks2

A unique feature of FirebaseDB is the database’s ability to alert apps that data inside the database has been changed. This alert caused a DataChanged event to occur – and which delivers the tag and value that were updated to the app.

FirebaseBlocks3

Reminder

FirebaseDB is experimental and incomplete, is subject to change, and should not be relied upon at this time for production code. However, you may use it for learning and experimentation.

Download Source Code

Download: FirebaseDB_Demo.aia

After downloading to your computer, you may upload the file to your App Inventor account using Projects | Import project (.aia) from my computer

Related Tutorials

 

More stuff coming soon …

Each week the past 3 weeks I thought I was going to have time to put together some new tutorials and post them, but “stuff happens” and I have not had time. I have a great list of tutorial suggestions that have come from readers and I really want to work on them and get them posted!

Sorry for the long delay!

In other news, I have completed the writing of Volume 4 of my App Inventor tutorial guide books. The book is now undergoing proof reading and final formatting. I hope to have it available as both an e-book and as a printed book.  I can now announce the title of the book “App Inventor: Graphics, Animation and Charts”. More details including a table of contents and sample pages as we get closer to release!

Free-Download App Inventor Text Files Cheat Sheet

Download here: App Inventor Basic Text Files Cheat Sheet (PDF)

High res, suitable for printing. Feel free to share with others.

App Inventor sample source code: TextFile.aia

Be sure to follow the links for more information about text files and where they are stored on your device and how to transfer files to your computer.

Here is a GIF image but use the PDF for printing:

Voila_Capture 2015-11-02_10-45-33_AM

E-Books and Printed Books

If you find these tutorials helpful (I hope you do!) please take a look at my books on App Inventor. To learn more about the books and where to get them (they are inexpensive) please see my App Inventor Books page.

  • App Inventor 2 Introduction (Volume 1 e-book)
    Step-by-step guide to easy Android programming
  • App Inventor 2 Advanced Concepts (Volume 2 e-book)
    Step-by-step guide to Advanced features including TinyDB
  • App Inventor 2 Databases and Files (Volume 3 e-book)
    Step-by-step TinyDB, TinyWebDB, Fusion Tables and Files
  • App Inventor 2 Graphics, Animation and Charts (Volume 4 e-book and printed book)
    Step-by-step guide to graphics, animation and charts

Thank you for visiting! — Ed

Free-Download App Inventor Location Sensor Cheat Sheet

Download here: App Inventor Location Sensor Cheat Sheet (PDF)

High res, suitable for printing. Feel free to share with others.

App Inventor sample source code: Location_WhereAmI.aia

Here is a GIF image but use the PDF for printing – also, where it says “enter a mailing address”, that should probably be “enter a street address”!

Voila_Capture 2015-10-28_12-21-17_PM

Post comments here or on our Facebook group page. Thank you!

E-Books and Printed Books

If you find these tutorials helpful (I hope you do!) please take a look at my books on App Inventor. To learn more about the books and where to get them (they are inexpensive) please see my App Inventor Books page.

  • App Inventor 2 Introduction (Volume 1 e-book)
    Step-by-step guide to easy Android programming
  • App Inventor 2 Advanced Concepts (Volume 2 e-book)
    Step-by-step guide to Advanced features including TinyDB
  • App Inventor 2 Databases and Files (Volume 3 e-book)
    Step-by-step TinyDB, TinyWebDB, Fusion Tables and Files
  • App Inventor 2 Graphics, Animation and Charts (Volume 4 e-book and printed book)
    Step-by-step guide to graphics, animation and charts

Thank you for visiting! — Ed

All new tutorial: Using TinyDB in App Inventor

I have completely rewritten and re-done my original tutorial on using TinyDB in App Inventor.

You can see the all new rewrite at Using TinyDB in App Inventor

TinyDB is a database used to store and retrieve values to semi-permanent storage on your phone or tablet. Unlike variables, which vanish when your app closes or your phone is turned off, values stored in the TinyDB are retained and can be accessed again, much later.

The original post was a popular post here on the blog, but it was brief and left out some details. I started over from scratch and wrote an all new, complete tutorial, with screen shots and blocks code, and downloadable App Inventor source code. Hope this helps!

E-Books and Printed Books

If you find these tutorials helpful (I hope you do!) please take a look at my books on App Inventor. To learn more about the books and where to get them (they are inexpensive) please see my App Inventor Books page.

  • App Inventor 2 Introduction (Volume 1 e-book)
    Step-by-step guide to easy Android programming
  • App Inventor 2 Advanced Concepts (Volume 2 e-book)
    Step-by-step guide to Advanced features including TinyDB
    • App Inventor 2 Databases and Files (Volume 3 e-book)
      Step-by-step TinyDB, TinyWebDB, Fusion Tables and Files
      Buy from: Amazon, Google Books, Kobo Books
  • App Inventor 2 Graphics, Animation and Charts (Volume 4 e-book and printed book)
    Step-by-step guide to graphics, animation and charts

Thank you for visiting! — Ed

Free-Download App Inventor Bluetooth Communications Cheat Sheet

Download here: App Inventor Bluetooth Cheat Sheet (PDF)

Covers basic Bluetooth text communications with links to tutorials on sending numeric and binary data, and connecting to Arduino over App Inventor Bluetooth.

App Inventor sample source code available here.

High res, suitable for printing. Feel free to share with others.

Here is a GIF image of the first page but use the PDF for printing (higher resolution) and it includes both pages:

Voila_Capture 2015-10-28_08-35-41_PM

Post comments here or on our Facebook group page. Thank you!

E-Books and Printed Books

If you find these tutorials helpful (I hope you do!) please take a look at my books on App Inventor. To learn more about the books and where to get them (they are inexpensive) please see my App Inventor Books page.

  • App Inventor 2 Introduction (Volume 1 e-book)
    Step-by-step guide to easy Android programming
  • App Inventor 2 Advanced Concepts (Volume 2 e-book)
    Step-by-step guide to Advanced features including TinyDB
  • App Inventor 2 Databases and Files (Volume 3 e-book)
    Step-by-step TinyDB, TinyWebDB, Fusion Tables and Files
  • App Inventor 2 Graphics, Animation and Charts (Volume 4 e-book and printed book)
    Step-by-step guide to graphics, animation and charts

Thank you for visiting! — Ed

Free-Download App Inventor OrientationSensor “Cheat Sheet”!

Download here: App Inventor Orientation Sensor Cheat Sheet (PDF)

High res, suitable for printing. Feel free to share with others.

Here is a GIF of the cheat sheet but use the PDF for printing (higher resolution):

Voila_Capture 2015-10-28_12-25-22_PM

Post comments here or on our Facebook group page. Thank you!

E-Books and Printed Books

If you find these tutorials helpful (I hope you do!) please take a look at my books on App Inventor. To learn more about the books and where to get them (they are inexpensive) please see my App Inventor Books page.

  • App Inventor 2 Introduction (Volume 1 e-book)
    Step-by-step guide to easy Android programming
  • App Inventor 2 Advanced Concepts (Volume 2 e-book)
    Step-by-step guide to Advanced features including TinyDB
  • App Inventor 2 Databases and Files (Volume 3 e-book)
    Step-by-step TinyDB, TinyWebDB, Fusion Tables and Files
  • App Inventor 2 Graphics, Animation and Charts (Volume 4 e-book and printed book)
    Step-by-step guide to graphics, animation and charts

Thank you for visiting! — Ed

Free – download MIT App Inventor “Cheat Sheet”

I have created a “cheat sheet” that captures all of the App Inventor components, blocks, events, properties and procedure calls. The “cheat sheet” is 9 page of details, in a large (almost 5 MB) PDF file that contains high resolution images suitable for high res printing. For those learning App Inventor, the cheat sheet may help you quickly find various components within the interface.

Download here: App Inventor Cheat Sheet (PDF)

Feel free to share with others.

I have some ideas for additional cheat sheets but would like to hear what you might like to have in a “cheat sheet” summary format. Post comments here or on our Facebook group page. Thank you!

E-Books and Printed Books

If you find these tutorials helpful (I hope you do!) please take a look at my books on App Inventor. To learn more about the books and where to get them (they are inexpensive) please see my App Inventor Books page.

  • App Inventor 2 Introduction (Volume 1 e-book)
    Step-by-step guide to easy Android programming
  • App Inventor 2 Advanced Concepts (Volume 2 e-book)
    Step-by-step guide to Advanced features including TinyDB
  • App Inventor 2 Databases and Files (Volume 3 e-book)
    Step-by-step TinyDB, TinyWebDB, Fusion Tables and Files
  • App Inventor 2 Graphics, Animation and Charts (Volume 4 e-book and printed book)
    Step-by-step guide to graphics, animation and charts

Thank you for visiting! — Ed

How to Place Your App Inventor Apps in the Google Play Store

An all new tutorial on this subject is available here as of May 2016! There is still some great information below – read both!

Apps you create in App Inventor may be added to the Google Play Store.

The process is not difficult but there are many steps to the process and you will need to create some graphic images to illustrate and promote your app in the store.

Summary of the Steps

  • Set your app’s VersionCode and VersionName.
  • Apply for a Google Developer account (one time fee of US $25 after which you can upload an unlimited number of apps, forever).
  • Create at least two and up to 8 screenshots of your app for display in the store’s app listing.
  • Create a “feature graphic” and a high resolution icon for use in the store listing.
  • Use the App Inventor provided keystore file, or use a keystore file you have created elsewhere or previously.
  • Build and export your app as a .apk file to your computer.
  • Create a title for your app in the store
  • Write a description for your app to appear in the store
  • Decide on free versus paid (paid requires a “merchant account” to be set up).
  • Upload your apk file, keystore file, image files and title and description, and provide some additional information (such as product category, pricing, and target audience).

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