Free-Download App Inventor Location Sensor Cheat Sheet

Download here: App Inventor Location Sensor Cheat Sheet (PDF)

High res, suitable for printing. Feel free to share with others.

App Inventor sample source code: Location_WhereAmI.aia

Here is a GIF image but use the PDF for printing – also, where it says “enter a mailing address”, that should probably be “enter a street address”!

Voila_Capture 2015-10-28_12-21-17_PM

Post comments here or on our Facebook group page. Thank you!

E-Books and Printed Books

If you find these tutorials helpful (I hope you do!) please take a look at my books on App Inventor. To learn more about the books and where to get them (they are inexpensive) please see my App Inventor Books page.

  • App Inventor 2 Introduction (Volume 1 e-book)
    Step-by-step guide to easy Android programming
  • App Inventor 2 Advanced Concepts (Volume 2 e-book)
    Step-by-step guide to Advanced features including TinyDB
  • App Inventor 2 Databases and Files (Volume 3 e-book)
    Step-by-step TinyDB, TinyWebDB, Fusion Tables and Files
  • App Inventor 2 Graphics, Animation and Charts (Volume 4 e-book and printed book)
    Step-by-step guide to graphics, animation and charts

Thank you for visiting! — Ed

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Sensors: Using the Accelerometer to detect motion

This tutorial introduces the accelerometer – at a high level – as a tool to detect the phone being shaken. You can use this feature as another kind of user input to your app – for example, make a game where shaking the phone resets the game play or starts a new game.

An accelerometer is a hardware device that detects and measures motion, typically in three axes: X, Y and Z. For example, if the phone is moved left or right, the acceleration changes in the X axis and the accelerometer returns a value indicating the X axis movement.

Smart phones – and many modern devices – have special hardware accelerometer components built in. The orientation sensor, described previously, is actually a software sensor that uses the hardware accelerometer but converts acceleration into orientation values.

The purpose of this demonstration app is to show one example of using the accelerometer.

The user interface is simple – it displays a Start button and a Stop button, and the status of the accelerometer.

AccelUI

 

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Sensors: How to use the Orientation Sensor

Smart phones and tablets contain several kinds of “sensors” to sense information about their environment. For example, an accelerometer provides information about movement of the phone (or tablet) – letting us know the speed and direction of travel in x, y and z coordinates (three dimensions).

The orientation sensor tells us if the phone is tilted to the left or right, or up or down (or flipped over). App Inventor provides a simple to use interface to the orientation sensor. We can use this to control a sprite or ball on the screen – by tilting our phone, we can make graphic items move around on the screen!

Sample source code that you can download is at the bottom of this post!

After going through this tutorial, you now know enough to create your own interactive smart phone game!

Review

Before we get started, please review these earlier tutorials:

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